Victoria Launch - The Home for Wayward Parrots

Event Date: 
May 22, 2018
Location: 
Bowen Books - 1644 Hillside Ave #111, Victoria, BC V8T 2C5

Darusha Wehm will launch The Home for Wayward Parrots in Victoria, BC, at Bolen Books on May 22nd at 7 pm with Sarah de Leeuw (Where It Hurts) and Daniel Griffin (Two Roads Home).

About the Authors:

Darusha writes science fiction and speculative poetry as M. Darusha Wehm and mainstream poetry and fiction as Darusha Wehm. Science fiction books include: Beautiful Red, Children of Arkadia and the Andersson Dexter cyberpunk detective series. Mainstream books include the Devi Jones’ Locker Young Adult series and The Home for Wayward Parrots (NeWest Press, Spring 2018). Darusha’s short fiction and poetry have appeared in many venues, including Arsenika, Nature, Escape Pod, and several anthologies. Darusha is originally from Canada but currently lives in Wellington, New Zealand after spending the past several years sailing the Pacific.

Sarah de Leeuw holds a Ph.D. in historical-cultural geography and is currently an Associate Professor with the Northern Medical Program at UNBC, the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia, where she works in medical humanities and the determinants of marginalized peoples' health. Her first book Unmarked was published in 2004. Her second volume, Geographies of a Lover, arrived in Spring 2012 and won the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize for the best book of poetry in British Columbia that year. Where It Hurts, a collection of creative non-fiction essays, was released in Spring 2017 and was nominated for a Governor General's Literary Award and the Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize.

Daniel Griffin was born in Kingston, Ontario, and has lived in Canada, the United States, Guatemala, the UK, France, New Zealand, and India. He’s the author of the short story collection Stopping for Strangers, a finalist for the Danuta Gleed and ReLit Awards, and holds an MFA from UBC. He currently lives in Victoria, BC, with his wife and three children. Two Roads Home is his first novel.

About the Books:

The Home for Wayward Parrots:

Accustomed to being an only child, adoptee Brian “Gumbo” Guillemot’s teenage hobby was searching for his birth parents. After years without a lead, when he finally finds his birth mother, Kim, he’s unprepared for the boisterous instant family that comes with her. No one, besides Kim, knows anything about Gumbo's birth father. With Kim refusing to answer any questions, Gumbo must choose whether to continue the search, even if it means alienating his few friends and both his families. And the more he learns, the more he wonders whether some things are better left unknown.

Captivating and playful, The Home For Wayward Parrots explores friendship, romance, modern families and geek pop culture with wit, compassion and extremely foul-mouthed birds.

Where It Hurts:

Where It Hurts is a highly charged collection of personal essays, haunted by loss, evoking turbulent physical and emotional Canadian landscapes. Sarah de Leeuw’s creative non-fiction captures strange inconsistencies and aberrations of human behaviour, urging us to be observant and aware. The essays are wide in scope and expose what—and who—goes missing.

With staggering insight, Sarah de Leeuw reflects on missing geographies and people, including missing women, both those she has known and those whom she will never get to know. The writing is courageously focused, juxtaposing places and things that can be touched and known—emotionally, physically, psychologically—with what has become intangible, unnoticed, or actively ignored. Throughout these essays, de Leeuw's imagistic memories are layered with meaning, providing a survival guide for the present, including a survival that comes with the profound responsibility to bear witness.

Two Roads Home:

It is 1993 on Vancouver Island. A group of idealistic environmental activists, convinced their peaceful protests have been in vain, turn to sabotage. But in a single night everything they’ve worked for goes terribly wrong: a security guard arrives just as the group sets off an explosion at a logging company warehouse.

Two Roads Home follows these activists as their lives—and their cause—spiral out of control. Pete, who set the bomb, heads off the grid where he discovers a vibrant community of squatters who have been affected by the explosion in unexpected ways. Meanwhile, Pete’s mother is determined to track him down in hopes she can help clear his name.

In Two Roads Home, Daniel Griffin deftly re-imagines history: what if, instead of the peaceful anti-logging protests of the 1990s, things had gone too far? How far is too far, when it comes to protesting injustice? And what happens when that line is crossed?