$19.95 CAD

Diamond Grill 10th Anniversary Edition

Fred Wah 978-1-897126-11-0 | 208 Pages September, 2006 Asian Canadian Literature, Biography & Memoir, Ebook

Also available as an ebook from

About this book

This story of family and identity, migration and integration, culture and self-discovery is told through family history, memory, and the occasional recipe.

Diamond Grill is a rich banquet where Salisbury steak shares a menu with chicken fried rice, and bird's nest soup sets the stage for Christmas plum pudding; where racism simmers behind the shiny clean surface of the action in the cafe.

An exciting new edition of Fred Wah's best-selling bio-fiction, on the 10th anniversary of its original publication, with an all new afterword by the author and the same pagination as the original publication.

Diamond Grill is the third title in NeWest Press' Landmark Editions series. Landmark Editions are previously published works by established and recognized western Canadian authors that will enjoy new life in this series. Playing Dead by Rudy Wiebe was the first book and The Almost Meeting by Henry Kreisel was the second in the Landmark Editions Series. NeWest is proud to offer this series as a strong addition to the heritage of western Canadian literature.

Reviews

“Fred Wah’s Diamond Grill is a small gem of a book . . . from unpunctuated prose poems, recipes, and excerpts from research materials, to beautifully detailed descriptions of the restaurant itself, funny and warm character sketches, and philosophical musings upon anthropology and identity.”

~ Quill and Quire

“. . . a sophisticated and moving text. . . Wah has produced a memorable account . . .”

~ Canadian Literature

“This collection has been written with delicate precision, and Fred Wah, who takes great care in reproducing his family histories and mixed-race heritage, delicious foods, seasons, and community life, makes the Diamond Grill come alive.”

~ Pacfic Reader

“Fred Wah’s Diamond Grill serves up a tasty literary entrée—as well as providing an entrance to a world about which we need to know if we’re to understand ourselves.”

~ The Vancouver Sun

“What a joy it is to read his beautifully written sentences, filled to bursting with well-chosen language.”

~ subTerrain

"Here, Wah makes claims to identity politics again and the intricacies of it, that universalism necessarily overwrites the distinctiveness that helps one articulates the “one-ness” of personal experience. Finding the happy medium between a larger culture and an individual community seems to be what is at stake for Wah as a “hyphenated subject.”

~ Asian American Literature Fans